Warsaw Times Union E Edition Page 1A

Kosciusko County Coun- cilman Jim Moyer is resign- ing his seat this month and taking a new job as assis- tant county surveyor. Moyer ran for surveyor in an Aug. 19 caucus to re- place departing surveyor Richard Kemper, but lost to Michael Kissinger, who served as assistant sur- veyor under Kemper. Moyer served on the council for five years and was a Harrison Township trustee for 15 years before that. His resignation from council, representing Dis- trict 2, is effective Sept. 28. A Republican caucus is set for Oct. 21 at 7 p.m. in the county courthouse to fill the remainder of his term. "I've enjoyed my time with council, it's been an honor and privilege, and I've enjoyed my service to the county and taxpayers," Moyer said this morning. He added that he is not planning on seeking any other office. The global orthopedic devices market is expected to reach $53.3 billion by 2021, according to a report published by IQ4I Research & Consultancy. The report analyzes the or- thopedic devices market in terms of market revenue for all segments. The market analysis is performed by type, applica- tion, end-users and region. DePuy Synthes accounts for the major orthopedic market share followed by Zimmer Bio- met and Stryker, according to the report, announced by the re- search firm Thursday. The re- port notes that Medtronic is a leading company in the spine implant market while DePuy Synthes has a major market share in hip implant. North America accounted for the largest share in 2014, ac- cording to the announcement. Market growth in the region was driven by high investments in healthcare infrastructures and demand for quality services. But the Asia-pacific region is expected to grow at the highest compound annual growth rate during the forecast period, the announcement states, due to in- creased healthcare awareness, improved economic growth and increasing government funds. Significant mergers and acquisi- tions, collaborations and joint ventures are some of the indus- try trends that are playing a major role for the market growth. The orthopedic devices mar- ket is driven by such factors as high prevalence of osteoporo- sis/osteoarthritis and increase in aging population, increase in preference for biologic implants, increasing awareness of mini- mally invasive surgeries, in- creasing number of outpatient procedures and an increase in sports and accident injuries, ac- cording to the report. Increasing pricing pressure from buyer and payer and the high cost of im- plants are the factors hamper- ing the market growth, the an- nouncement adds. The report also cites ad- vancements in the field of robot- ics, computer navigated surgeries, smart implants, nan- otechnology, 3D printings, bio- logics and tissue engineering as being recognized as "the future of orthopedics." The use of cus- tomized implants is increasing in the market as patient de- mands more comfortable prod- uct fit for implantation, the report states. NORTH MANCHESTER - Every Labor Day weekend it has been a tradition for family to stay with JD and Delores Aughinbaugh. These reunions at the Aughinbaugh farm would last all weekend long and the festivities consist of camping by the pond, enjoy- ing good food, playing lawn games and abandoning busy schedules for peaceful relaxation with their imme- diate family. To commemorate a mile- stone anniversary and thank their hosts, the fam- ily decided to give a special gift. They rediscovered the history of the Aughinbaugh family farm and how it has been passed down since its purchase from Martin Van Buren in 1837. Robert Day, of N & R Woodworking, Peru, Ind., was hired to create a sign for JD and Delores. The sign uses a 100-year-old barn door as its base and has a family tree with branches that show the passing down of the farm from Samuel and Sarah Urley to its present owners. When asked, JD claimed he had always been aware of this history and that sometimes you forget that other farms are not like this. Today, JD utilizes his farm land for growing corn and beans. When he lived on the farm as a boy, his father was involved in dairy pro- duction. The family also had horses on the land at one time. JD gained this property from his older brother, the late Austin Aughinbaugh. It is his five children, JD's nephews and nieces, who are the regulars for attend- ing the Labor Day reunion. JD and Delores also have a son and daughters and would like for this farm to stay with one of the Aughin- baugh relatives. If the farm stays with them another 22 years, the family will be able to cele- brate the 200-year anniver- sary of the purchasing of the family farm. JD and Delores already love the sign they received and are determined to pre- serve it for as long as they can. By next spring they hope to add a layer of var- nish to protect the sign from the elements and would like to add landscaping to high- light their family heritage. MICHIGAN CITY (AP) - Authorities say a Nappanee man who died after being swept off a pier into Lake Michigan by a large wave was tak- ing photos with his fiancee and two other couples. Indiana conservation officer Sgt. Shawn Brown says 24-year-old Earl Helmuth and the five others were swept into the lake Saturday in Michigan City. Brown says Helmuth's body was found Sunday morning after the search had been suspended due to treacherous conditions. According to Brown, Helmuth could not swim. Helmuth's fiancee and two others were able to get back to the pier. Two others, including a preg- nant woman, clung to the lighthouse's con- crete wall and were res- cued by the U.S. Coast Guard. Brown says Helmuth and his fiancee planned to marry next month. Helmuth's obituary appears on page 3A. BY KERI KOENIG Times-Union Correspondent Times-Union Sports Entertainment Clear tonight; sunny Tuesday. Contact Us Phone: 574-267-3111 Email: news@timesuniononline.com Website: www.timesuniononline.com Mail: P.O.B. 1448 Warsaw, IN 46581-1448 Low 45 High 75 Monday September 21, 2015 In our 161st year of continuous service to Kosciusko County Golf Lady Warriors win first sectional title since 2010. Page 1B Emmys Big night for HBO with 'Veep,' 'Thrones.' Page 7A TIMES UNION $0.50 8 5 32320 00001 STAFF REPORT Photo by Gary Nieter, Times-Union Photo by Gary Nieter, Times-Union STAFF REPORT See RUDY- Page 2A Photo by Keri Koenig, Times-Union 50 Cents Warsaw, IN Founded 1854 No. 223 Nappanee Man Swept Off Pier Was Taking Photos With Fiancee Aughinbaughs Celebrate History, Heritage Of Farm JD and Delores Aughinbaugh pose with a sign created to commemorate the histo- ry and origin of the farm. A stove left on after the residences left started a house fire at 405 Wexford Place, Warsaw, Sunday afternoon. The home is owned by Blayne and Christy Woodcock. Warsaw Fire Department responded to the fire at 4:10 p.m. The mobile home was unoccupied at the time of the fire. Warsaw Fire Chief Mike Wilson said that the fire was put out in 20 minutes. Damages were estimated at $15,000. WFD was assisted by Winona Lake Fire Department. Warsaw Fire Department responded to Fullers Small Engine Repair, 221 Hand Ave., Warsaw, at 8 p.m. Saturday. The fire was started by a welding accident, according to Warsaw Fire Chief Mike Wilson. One occupant was transported to Kosciusko Community Hospital for smoke inhalation and was released. It took 25 minutes to put out the fire. Damages are estimated at $15,000. WFD was assisted by Winona Lake Fire Department. Fire Injures One Stove Fire Research Says Orthopedic Market Expected To Grow Nancy Zolman was on va- cation Sept. 12 when her Shih-Tzu went missing. Zolman, Winona Lake, said she had boarded the 11-month-old dog, named Rudy, at Animal Medical Center, West Winona Av- enue, Warsaw. Rudy is Zolman's second dog and has been fixed. She also has another Shih Tzu. "They took him out for a routine potty break over by Marsh Supermarket parking BY JENNIFER PERYAM Times-Union Staff Writer jperyam@timesuniononline.com Winona Woman Seeks Missing Shih-Tzu, 'Rudy' Rudy County Councilman Resigns To Take Surveyor Job

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